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Of Female Genital Mutilation

Ashenafi Zedebub

 Many researches show millions have undergone the so called “Female Genital Mutilation” around the globe. By the way, what is “Female Genital Mutilation”? The word “mutilation” by itself had its own controversy prior to its familiarization with the public.  

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is – by definition – the cutting or partial or total removal of the external female genitalia either for cultural or religious or other non-medical reasons. Such mutilation is said to be usually performed on girls between the ages of 4 and 10. There are also people still using its “original identification”- i.e. “female circumcision.” However, here I prefer to stick to the internationally accepted word “mutilation” or rather “FGM” in short as to join the majority.

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Women at the top

Ashenafi Zedebub

http://addisstandard.com/admin/uploads/March%208th%20p.%2014%20-15.jpgIt is not at all a rare occurrence nowadays to see women assuming a high post in government, public or private organizations.

Today, we see women named or elected to hold office of a prime minister, minister, and bank president, CEO of insurance companies and large establishments, as speaker of parliament, as a judge, as a notary public, as editor-in-chief or managing editor of mass media and so on and so forth.

“Women at the top” as very high ranking politicians are also seen in our world of today. For instance; Mrs Clinton is heading the foreign office of what they call “a strongest nation on earth” - The United States of America - as Secretary of State.  Mrs Angela Merkel is heading a government of a leading industrialized nation of Europe - The Federal Republic of Germany- as Federal Chancellor. In our country Ethiopia, we have as well, among others, one woman minister appointed as Minister of Mines - a post heretofore held by men. Mrs. Sinknesh Ejigu is the Minister of Mines of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia.

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Is silence really golden?

Ashenafi Zedebub

From the January 2012 edition of Addis Standard magazine


“Speech is silver, but silence golden”- much to my surprise, this commonly used proverb has been quoted as an “old English saying”,  usually by British writers of course. 

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Why an old English saying? Were Britons the only people  under the sun, who happened to understand the value of speech and the quality of silence? Can’t we find the same phrase , or at least the nearly alike to it, in other languages – say in Arabic, French, German, Spanish, Italian, etc..? And what about in our own language Amharic? ”Zimita work naw”, for instance, means “silence is golden”.

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