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Op/Ed

Editorial

Arguably, Ethiopia’s nation building course is far from over. Many agree it is in fact far from being on the right track. But inarguably Ethiopia is a state – a state that has its own constitution with a clearly marked distinction between the executive, the judiciary and the legislative; a state that is playing international and regional roles of its own creed and capacity; a state that is signatory to numerous international conventions ranging from protecting individual liberty to its environment.

But if one goes by the country’s recent crackdown against journalists, bloggers, opposition party members and Muslim protestors, it is compellingly easy (and tempting) to question whether the country’s security apparatus is acting as if this is a failed state and getting along with it.

Opinion

By Carlos Lopes 

Cameroon has the resources for its industrialization and agricultural transformation. The economy’s current annual growth of 4.9% does not reflect the full potential that lies in the transformation of the riches of the country. The economy is relatively diversified with the exploitation of vast agricultural resources, forestry, mining and energy. Exports have been dominated by oil, cocoa, wood, rubber and cotton. This diversification in resources lends itself to economic transformation through industrialization.

Merkeb Negash, Special to Addis Standard

All previous articles on Ethiopian developmental statism on this magazine started with what the Ethiopian developmental state fails to be. It is argued that the Ethiopian state is nothing like the highly sophisticated state apparatus of the East Asian states and that it is – as a result- corrupt, soft and prone to capture. This pessimist diagnosis of the Ethiopian state is followed by highly ambitious, if not naïve, prescriptions that are neither necessary nor achievable at this level of socio-economic development.