HomeOpinion (Page 24)

Opinion

By Zecharias Zelalem, special to Addis Standard

On Saturday, September 3rd 2016, something sinister, ghastly, premeditated and honestly speaking somewhat poorly calculated, transpired in the Ethiopian capital of Addis Abeba. The tragedy in question has, for the most part, managed to avoid the sort of outcry and global condemnation these incidents tend to get when the actors involved are from nations not allied with the United States and its NATO affiliates in their “war on terror.” It has been more than two weeks, and already we are faced with subliminal calls from the conceited to pretend it didn’t happen.

 

By David Thompson

Olympic silver medalist Feyisa Lilesa took complete control of the conversation surrounding his outstanding performance in Rio. Typically, conversations after an Olympic event circle around the standard, “What were you thinking during the last mile?” or opportunities to talk of one’s own achievements. Feyisa completed the incredible feat of finishing a marathon in 2:09:54, yet, he brought light to a more serious issue: Ethiopia’s killing and marginalization of the Oromo population.

Stelios Michalopoulos and Elias Papaioannou

 Providence/London – Why are some regions plagued by seemingly endless instability? In the Middle East, one widespread argument, which even the Islamic State expounds, puts much of the blame for chronic conflict on the Sykes-Picot Agreement, the secret deal agreed 100 years ago by France and Great Britain to divide between them the soon-to-be-former Ottoman Empire. According to this view, while the “lines in the sand” drawn by the diplomats Mark Sykes and François Georges-Picot served the short-term interests of the colonial powers, the arbitrary partition of the region spurred a century of violence, organized and otherwise.